Pre-order

The Technology of the Fischer-Tropsch Process

$25.00

Spend $30.00 to Free Shipping
INFORMATION
further research
CUSTOMER REVIEWS
PRODUCT INFORMATION

Used 

Condition: Good

Author: B. H. Weil and J. C. Lane

Published: 1949

Contains a pocket and writing on the outside from previous library. 

further research
FISCHER-TROPSCH PROCESS

The Fischer–Tropsch process is a collection of chemical reactions that converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen into liquid hydrocarbons. These reactions occur in the presence of metal catalysts, typically at temperatures of 150–300 °C (302–572 °F) and pressures of one to several tens of atmospheres. The process was first developed by Franz Fischer and Hans Tropsch at the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Kohlenforschung in Mülheim an der Ruhr , Germany, in 1925.

As a premier example of C1 chemistry , the Fischer–Tropsch process is an important reaction in both coal liquefaction and gas to liquids technology for producing liquid hydrocarbons. In the usual implementation, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, the feedstocks for FT, are produced from coal, natural gas, or biomass in a process known as gasification. The Fischer–Tropsch process then converts these gases into a synthetic lubrication oil and synthetic fuel. The Fischer–Tropsch process has received intermittent attention as a source of low-sulfur diesel fuel and to address the supply or cost of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons.

CUSTOMER REVIEWS
The Technology of the Fischer-Tropsch Process

The Technology of the Fischer-Tropsch Process

$25.00
Pre-loader