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Space Pen

$6.00

You can finally take notes, write fan fiction, or doodle where traditional ballpoint pins cannot!

Thanks to its pressurized ink cartridge, this pen can write:

  • at any angle
  • in zero gravity
  • underwater
  • in extreme hot or cold temperatures 
  • through grease

 

Pen color matches ink color. 

 

More info:

During early space flights, pencils were used to write in space. But these posed too many potential hazards and typical ballpoint pens don’t work in the microgravity of Earth orbit. Paul Fisher of the Fisher Pen Company spent over $1 million of his own money to develop a pen with a nitrogen-pressurized ink cartridge that could write in zero gravity and in a vacuum. In 1965, after years of development, he presented his anti-gravity pen to NASA and, after testing it for 18 months, they purchased 400 pens for $2.95 each. The Fisher Space Pen has been used on every American and Russian manned space flight since 1967. 

There’s a common myth that the US spent millions (sometimes billions) of taxpayer money to develop this pen while Soviet Russia solved this problem by just using a pencil. This is 100% false. Help fight misinformation!

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SPACE PEN

Several instruments have been used to write in outer space, including different types of pencils and pens. Some of them have been unmodified versions of conventional writing instruments; others have been invented specifically to counter the problems with writing in space conditions. A common misconception states that, faced with the fact that ball-point pens would not write in zero-gravity, the Fisher Space Pen was devised as the result of millions of dollars of unnecessary spending on NASA's part when the Soviet Union took the simpler and cheaper route of just using pencils. In reality, the space pen was independently developed by Paul C. Fisher, founder of the Fisher Pen Company, with $1 million of his own funds.

NASA tested and approved the pen for space use, then purchased 400 pens at $6 per pen. The Soviet Union subsequently also purchased the space pen for its Soyuz spaceflights. When practically all writing in space intended for permanent record (e.g., logs, details and results of scientific experiments) is electronic, the discussion of writing instruments in space is somewhat academic: hard copy is produced infrequently, as of 2019. The laptops used (as of 2012, IBM/Lenovo ThinkPads) need customization for space use, such as radiation-, heat- and fire-resistance.

informational video
CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
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N. (Ohio, United States)
Very cool!

Saw this and thought it was so unique! Got it as a christmas gift for a friend so I'm so excited cuz I know he'll love it!

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
N
N. (Ohio, United States)
Very cool!

Saw this and thought it was so unique! Got it as a christmas gift for a friend so I'm so excited cuz I know he'll love it!

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