Pre-loader
Out stock

Fusible Alloy Ingot

$2.00$1.00

You Save: $1.00 (50%)

This metal disc is an alloy that melts at a relatively low temperature; in this case, around 200 °F (95 °C), which is lower than the temperature of boiling water.

Fusible metals are alloys that melt at low temperatures, generally below 300 °F (149 °C), and are commonly used by hobbyists since they can be used to make custom jigs, tools, and casts in situations that would not be cost-effective for mass production. Plus, once a project is complete, it can be remelted and used for a new project.

The low melting point is caused by the addition of the elements bismuth and tin to the alloy composition, both of which have somewhat low melting points.

Fusible metals are also used in automatic fire sprinklers common in commercial buildings. Water pressure in the sprinkler pipe is held in by a plug made of an alloy designed to melt at a specific temperature. When a fire is present, the heat melts the plug, and the pressure forces the water out.

This alloy contains some lead. Do not ingest it.

CUSTOMER REVIEWS
CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
A
A.P. (Florida, United States)
Wow!

I bought this but couldn't find good info about "what it sticks to" - i have the same issues with Gallium metals. Anyhow; I bought a cheap single-egg frying pan coated in a nonstick (Teflon?) substance. I put the ingot in, and raised the stove temp slowly.... and POOF all of a sudden it BLOOPED into liquid metal! I was overjoyed. I used a wood toothpick to snag off the weird yellow paint cap; and sure enough; molten metal. I poured it into a silicone candy mold; it took a LONG time to reach "touchable" temperatures. It did leave a little residue on the pan and in the mold; so this is not a lossless process; but the remnants were minimal and all went into a freezer bag for storage until I play with it again.

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
A
A.P. (Florida, United States)
Wow!

I bought this but couldn't find good info about "what it sticks to" - i have the same issues with Gallium metals. Anyhow; I bought a cheap single-egg frying pan coated in a nonstick (Teflon?) substance. I put the ingot in, and raised the stove temp slowly.... and POOF all of a sudden it BLOOPED into liquid metal! I was overjoyed. I used a wood toothpick to snag off the weird yellow paint cap; and sure enough; molten metal. I poured it into a silicone candy mold; it took a LONG time to reach "touchable" temperatures. It did leave a little residue on the pan and in the mold; so this is not a lossless process; but the remnants were minimal and all went into a freezer bag for storage until I play with it again.

Pre-loader