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2017 Solar Eclipse Commemorative Poster

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Our commemorative poster we commissioned to celebrate the solar eclipse that had America synchronously looking upward on August 21, 2017.

This print features the Tulsa skyline along with the exact time & magnitude of the eclipse at our shop's exact coordinates.

 

Artist: Jeremy Luther
Size: 8" x 18" vertical
Medium: Screen printed gold metallic ink on black by Flash Flood.
Limited leftovers from the original run of 100—each hand-signed and numbered by the artist.

Ships rolled in tube.

FURTHER RESEARCH
SOLAR ECLIPSE OF 2017

The solar eclipse of August 21, 2017, dubbed the "Great American Eclipse" by the media, was a total solar eclipse visible within a band that spanned the contiguous United States from the Pacific to the Atlantic coasts. It was also visible as a partial solar eclipse from as far north as Nunavut in northern Canada to as far south as northern South America. In northwestern Europe and Africa, it was partially visible in the late evening. In northeastern Asia, it was partially visible at sunrise.

Prior to this event, no solar eclipse had been visible across the entirety of the United States since June 8, 1918; not since the February 1979 eclipse had a total eclipse been visible from anywhere in the mainland United States. The path of totality touched 14 states, and the rest of the U.S. had a partial eclipse. The area of the path of totality was about 16 percent of the area of the United States, with most of this area over the ocean, not land. The event's shadow began to cover land on the Oregon coast as a partial eclipse at 4:05 p.m. UTC (9:05 a.m. PDT), with the total eclipse beginning there at 5:16 p.m. UTC (10:16 a.m. PDT); the total eclipse's land coverage ended along the South Carolina coast at about 6:44 p.m. UTC (2:44 p.m. EDT). Visibility as a partial eclipse in Honolulu, Hawaii began with sunrise at 4:20 p.m. UTC (6:20 a.m. HST) and ended by 5:25 p.m. UTC (7:25 a.m. HST).

This total solar eclipse marked the first such event in the smartphone and social media era in America. Information, personal communication, and photography were widely available as never before, capturing popular attention and enhancing the social experience. The event was received with much enthusiasm across the nation; people gathered outside their homes to watch it, and many parties were set up in the path of the eclipse. Many people left their homes and traveled hundreds of miles just to get a glimpse of totality, which most people never get to experience. Marriage proposals took place coinciding with the eclipse, and at least one wedding was also planned and took place to coincide with the eclipse. Logistical problems were expected with the influx of visitors, especially for smaller communities. The sale of counterfeit eclipse glasses was also anticipated to be a hazard for eye injuries.

Future total solar eclipse will cross the United States in April 2024 (12 states).

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CUSTOMER REVIEWS
2017 Solar Eclipse Commemorative Poster

2017 Solar Eclipse Commemorative Poster

$5.00$3.00
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